Menu
Home > Ask > General

Ask Ananda’s Experts
Questions and answers about meditation, yoga, the spiritual life, and more

Ask a question

Category: General

  Page 1 of 24   Next

Rajesh
India

Question

Dear Sir, Pranam,

I have been following Yogananda and Babaji from the past 6 years and I am a Kriyaban. Sir, throughout my life my conduct has been honest and innocent like a child. Yet on many occasions, people have cheated me, badly affecting my morale. I have lost not only my peace, and money, but have lost faith as well.

Sir, when I don’t do anything wrong, why again and again do I get trapped and something goes drastically wrong? Is it because of very bad Karma of mine in my past life?

Pranam,

Rajesh

Nayaswami Pranaba

Nayaswami Pranaba

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Rajesh,

Karma definitely comes into play with everything that happens to us. The important thing is that in this lifetime we endeavor to make the choices to overcome these tendencies that draw to us the experiences that you have described.

The best way to overcome one’s karma, and to neutralize the effect other people have in your life, is to meet whatever karma comes to you calmly and pleasantly. Concentrate not your problems with others, but more on generating a strong flow of positive energy.

melanya
usa

Question

What is the difference between sympathy and empathy? And which is the more important quality to develop on the spiritual path?

Nayaswami Pranaba

Nayaswami Pranaba

Ananda Village

Answer

A simple way to understand the difference is that sympathy is when we feel pity or sorrow for someone else’s misfortunes, whereas empathy is when we understand and share the feelings of someone else.

Empathy is more important to develop on the spiritual path since one is able to feel the connection with someone who is suffering rather than just feel sorry for someone. Of course we also need to emphasize non-attachment so we are not caught in the potential whirlpool of emotions.

July 28
2014

Jeni
Israel

Question

Dear Gyandev: Why do the animals suffer? Someone answered me that they don’t have an ego and therefore do not suffer, and I know that neither do they have karma. I’m not sure, because clearly they feel physical pain! Why is there suffering and torture of animals, such as in slaughterhouses and hatcheries? I can understand a personal pain or suffering as an action-reaction? But how is the law of animal life, that without karma, any animal can be a victim of any painful torture by anyone?

Nayaswami Gyandev

Nayaswami Gyandev

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Jeni,

When animals experience pain, usually it’s simply nature taking its course: the animal has an accident or gets attacked by another animal. Neither ego nor karma nor torture is involved; instinct rules the animal world, and they are locked into a fixed progression of expanding consciousness.

June 9
2014

Vivek Rana
India

Question

Respected Guruji, I am currently an Engg. student but unable to pass exam as I don’t feel curiosity and interest while studying the subjects, as I am on my verge of changing my career, will meditation help me to recognize my talent and work with that, if yes, then how?

Nayaswami Devarshi

Nayaswami Devarshi

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Friend,

You are certainly asking the right question, one that more people should be asking as they embark on adult life and career!

Meditation — more specifically the intuition developed through meditation — can help you to find the right career. Paramhansa Yogananda addressed this exact question:

Niraj
India

Question

Around 1989 in India TV serial the Mahabharata was broadcast and has had a tremendous success. Now also a TV serial is launched which is fairly successful. Two characters stand out. One is Arjuna and the other Karna. Karna died in the war with Arjuna years later. These two gentlemen left the world and also left behind a legacy of scholars more aggressive than them continuously debating on who is the greater warrior of the two. What were Yoganandaji‘s views on Karna?

Nayaswami Gyandev

Nayaswami Gyandev

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Niraj,

Paramhansa Yogananda stated that the major characters in the Mahabharata were actual historical figures, so the question of who was the greater warrior is not moot. And it would be interesting to know Yoganandaji’s assessment, given that he said he was, in a former incarnation, Arjuna! However, I am not aware of anything that Yoganandaji may have said about the historical Karna.

Nicki
UK

Question

Hello!

I’ve been meditating for more than a year now, and I notice that I find myself going back to the past, to events that I believed were long resolved. Even to the point of questioning whether my mother was a “good” parent. But I find my mind resurrecting things long forgotten. What does this mean — that deep down I resent my parents?

Blessings.

Kristy Fassler-Hecht

Kristy Fassler-Hecht

Ananda Maine

Answer

Dear Nicki,

You don’t mention what technique of meditation you are practicing so I can’t respond directly to how your meditations and past memories are connected. However, you can trust if there are long forgotten memories surfacing, they need your attention and awareness.

Niraj
India

Question

Is the Mahabharata written by Vyasa 100% authentic and true? What were Yoganandaji‘s views on this? If its not 100 % true can any evidence be offered?

Nayaswami Gyandev

Nayaswami Gyandev

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Niraj,

Paramhansa Yogananda said that the main characters in the Mahabharata were actual historical figures, and that there was indeed such a conflict over a kingdom. Yoganandaji further stated that Arjuna was one of his own earlier incarnations, that Babaji was Krishna, and that James Lynn (Yoganandaji’s most advanced disciple) was Nakula.

Carina
Europe

Question

I find it quite helpful at times to be the observer of my mind, thoughts and feelings, watching them pass like a movie and not giving them any attention (just as we learn in meditation). This helps us to not get attached and to control our reactive process. And even though Swamiji mentioned the term “silent observer” in his book “Demystifying Patanjali,” I would very much like to know if Master recommended this technique and if it is in tune with the teachings. Thank you.

Nayaswami Pranaba

Nayaswami Pranaba

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Carina,

Paramhansa Yogananda did indeed recommend this technique of being the “silent observer.” He taught that in meditation, specifically in the Hong-Sau Technique, to emphasize this approach. He also encouraged this approach when we are involved in the various activities of daily life.

  Page 1 of 24   Next