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Questions and Answers About Meditation, Yoga, the Spiritual Life, and More

Category: Meditation

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Sumukh Hegde
India

Question

hello. I’ve got anxiety disorder, on meds. I’ve noticed when in meditation, sometimes intense unpleasant heat is generated in parts esp near ears. harder I try to concentrate hotter it gets. Ive noticed it is associated with an unfocussed mind. Medically they call this psychosomatic symptoms. But when strongly focused on my Guru, it dissapears. Is this me unable to channel energy properly? I’d like to know your take on this. Thank you.

Nayaswami Hriman

Nayaswami Hriman

Ananda Seattle

Answer

Dear Friend,

Since you have specific health conditions which are being treated by a health care professional, I must be cautious in my comments. If you are having good results by concentrating on your Guru, this seems a good and safe course of action. As to whether your symptoms are the result of an unfocused mind, that is a much broader question and could be as much related to medical conditions as to the mind itself. There’s nothing wrong with developing your concentration skills. Any one can benefit from doing THAT, whether during meditation or by engaging in specific mental concentration techniques.

During meditation, it is always good to avoid concentrating so "hard" that tension (and heat!) results. Think of something that you enjoy doing where the need to concentrate doesn’t exist because you enjoy doing it! That’s how meditation should be. Swami Kriyananda, in his popular book, Awaken to Superconsciousness, describes meditation as "upward relaxation into superconsciousness." Always emphasize RELAXATION first in the art of meditation. From devotion and sincere yearning for God, Guru, or inner peace, concentration becomes natural and not a strain upon the brain or the mind.

Approach, therefore, meditation with joy; with devotion; with sincere love. It would help you, I think, to practice some hatha yoga before sitting. Certainly, to practice some pranayama as your guru recommends. Paramhansa Yogananda commented that "Chanting is half the battle." This can include mantra also. So, try chanting both as part of meditation and part of daily life.

Remember: RELAXATION IS THE KEY!

Blessings,

Swami Hrimananda

sanjay
india

Question

Can you give me tips on becoming aware of the natural breath in the upper nostril area?

Nayaswami Savitri

Nayaswami Savitri

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Sanjay, The best way to become aware of the breath in the upper part of your nostrils is through learning and practicing daily Yogananda’s Hong-Sau Technique of concentration/meditation. In the Art and Science of Raja Yoga, Swami Kriyananda, while carefully explaining this technique, includes the following information about breathing in different parts of the nostrils:

"Begin by mentally watching the breathing process: the movement of lungs, navel, and diaphragm; gradually only, as you grow calmer, shift your attention to the breath itself. At this point, feel it as it enters the nostrils. And even here you may find it natural to go through a transition from physical to more subtle awareness. That is, as the breath becomes finer, feel it gradually higher and higher in the nasal passage. In the Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krishna gives the counsel to concentrate on nasikagram, 'the beginning of the nose.' Commentators often interpret this passage to mean 'the tip of the nose,' since agra means 'front' as well as 'beginning.' But no subtle chakra, or nerve plexus, exists in the tip of the nose. It is at the other end of the nose that yogis concentrate. Here is the seat of spiritual vision. Normally, to make it easier to locate, this seat is spoken of as being located at the point between the eyebrows. But where the breath is considered as part of the concentrative process, it is more appropriate to think of this seat as being located at the origin of the nose. In fact, the real center is situated in the frontal lobe of the brain. The breath, as it enters and leaves the nasal passage, passes very close to this point. To visualize the breath passing this point helps to stimulate this center. As you watch the breath in the nose, then, feel it becoming gradually calmer until you can feel it at the point between the eyebrows."

In addition, you might try feeling/experiencing the coolness of the air as you inhale and it passes through the nose up into the sinus area, then in turn, feel the warmth of the air as you exhale and as the air passes back out of the sinuses into the nostrils.

In the beginning of this process, try placing your right index finger horizontally under your nose and feel the gentle sensations of coolness and warmth being created there, as you inhale and exhale. When you have a good sense of these sensations, move your finger away and transfer the feeling into the lower nose, then up into upper nostrils, and finally into the area of the sinuses and the point between the eyebrows.

ruchit
india

Question

during my spiritual practice i.e when i do my spiritual work i suddenly feel cold sensation on my whole body it’s like not too much cold but when it occurs all of my hairs on my hands stands up i.e become erect and also it starts from lower to upper body it ends at top of my head i.e above my head and at that point i feel like something is floating above my head i can feel it but can’t describe i hope you can understand please tell me what is it??

Puru (Joseph) Selbie

Puru (Joseph) Selbie

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Ruchit,

What you are experiencing is yourself — but on a more subtle level. Yogananda explained that we inhabit three bodies simultaneously: physical, astral, and causal. Our physical body tends to dominate our awareness. It’s what our senses reveals to us as we see, hear, taste, smell, and touch.

Our astral body is more subtle. It is pure energy. It is also larger than your physical body. As you meditate more deeply you will become more aware of the astral body. One’s awareness of the astral body often begins with sensations such as you describe. What you are beginning to "feel" more consciously are the subtle energies of the astral body that exist within and around the physical body. Some people can "see" the astral body as an aura.

Our causal body is yet more subtle. It is pure thought. Sri Yukteswar said we are primarily using our physical body when sensing, our astral body when visualizing or willing, and our causal body when thinking deeply.

Your experience of your astral self is positive. Don’t be surprised if it changes as you meditate more. Part of the joy of meditation is experienced as a fountain spray of astral energy up the spine. But don’t be satisfied with just pleasant sensations. Go deeper. As you go deeper you will eventually find yourself saturated and expanding in the sea of Bliss Itself.

Warm regards,

Puru (Joseph) Selbie

Emma S
USA

Question

I have been meditating for about 6 months now and I love love it. However, I have not told anyone and am afraid to because a lot of people make fun of meditation. Also, I have a really hard time meditating on my own without a guided mediation. I can’t get myself to calm down or my mind to shut up on my own. I also need motivation to meditate. I just want inner calmness. Any support that you could give at all would be so much appreciated! Thanks so much in advance. Love and peace to all!

Nayaswami Savitri

Nayaswami Savitri

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Emma,

So glad to know that you love to meditate! That’s half the battle — never let go of that love and feed it in any way you can.

Don’t worry about not telling anyone that you meditate. You are right that most people wouldn’t understand anyway. But it is hard to do things in a vacuum, so it might be good to find other meditators in your area that would "speak the same language" so to speak — look at Find Ananda Near You for details. Being around other people who meditate and meditating with them as often as possible is a huge help. If you live in an area where this is impossible (or even if you don’t) I’d strongly advise you to join our online Ananda Virtual Community. On-line group meditations may be a big help to you also!

Guided meditations can be very helpful, especially in the beginning of your meditative life. But here is an important point to remember. Meditation comes in two parts: the "getting there" and the "being there." Every meditation should have elements of both.

Getting there involves all the technique you use to help you get into deep, silent, sitting meditation. Guided meditation can be a part of getting there. But always leave time for being there, that is, sitting silently and being as calm and inward as possible. Even if you feel restless, do it anyway, for at least five minutes. It will get easier as time goes on. But to neglect the "being there" part of meditation is like fixing a delicious meal, but not taking time to eat it. What is the "there" part of meditation?" Superconscious bliss and oneness with God and with all that is. You'll definitely recognize it when it happens.

Much of meditation involves creating good habits. Meditate at the same time, same place, every day without fail, even if it’s only for five to ten minutes. Build up the length of time as you feel to. It’s infinitely better to meditate just a little bit, than not at all.

If you fail to meditate on any one or more days (it happens to everybody), at least notice that your daily life is affected — life is so much better when you meditate than when you don’t even try! Noticing this is an excellent motivator!

God watches the intentions of our hearts and will know that we are trying — and thus will offer us the grace to keep going, no matter what. Calming the restless mind is what we all struggle with. Don’t say you can’t. Just say you have not yet succeeded.

Having the right techniques of meditation (watching the breath, a mantra, etc.) are a huge help. If you don’t know these techniques yet, be sure to learn them in our online Learn to Meditate course as soon as possible.

Finally, please remember that you already have inner calmness. It’s just a process of learning to find where it is within you. Blessings and joy to you always!

ruchit
india

Question

thing is when i meditate first thing i experience is when i am calm and close eyes i notice some colors floating around me such as purple,red and white and sometime it feel like i suddenly got shot i.e travelling into white light what is it??

also sometime when i finish meditating i feel electrical sensations on some body part like those part are getting shocked or something buzzing under its skin what is it??

Nayaswami Seva

Nayaswami Seva

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Ruchit,

Since I do not have these experiences myself I can only guide you with some thoughts I have heard from my teacher, Swami Kriyananda. What you are describing seems to me to be spurts of Kundalini energy rising from the base of your spine (the coccyx center or Muladhara Chakra). There are six centers in the spine that act as transformers, so to speak, for the main energy of Kundalini that travels upward to the brain or to the Spiritual Eye, the center at the point between the eyebrows.

Swamiji continues to say that Kundalini, the serpent power, is man’s greatest single key to enlightenment. Only from arousing this force from its sleep state at the base of the spine from its resistance to divine truth can the soul hope to reunite itself with the spirit.

There is much written about Kunalini and the chakras. You can read Swami Kriyananda’s words in The Art and Science of Raja Yoga and Chakras for Starters books published in India by Ananda. The meditation technique that Yogananda has given us is called, Kriya. This technique gently helps to raise the Kundalini energy. Raising this power too quickly and strongly can be harmful.

Possibly you are experiencing these spurts of energy from the Kundalini. What you want to experience, however, is the full flow which can come with proper meditation techniques, such as Kriya. You can become engrossed in the spurts (the beautiful colors, etc.), but they will not take you to your goal. It is best when in meditation, in the calm state, when feeling this energy, to focus your attention at the Spiritual Eye, the Ajna Chakra. Feel that the energy is going there. Keep your concentration strong at this center. Eventually these spurts will calm down and will flow naturally upward.

Joy to you, Seva

ruchit
india

Question

i’m meditating at night and concentrating on god within myself and i don’t sleep so will this not getting sleep affect me in any way??

also sometime i feel tingling sensation on my forehead point like getting pulled or some ants moving on that point what is it?

Nayaswami Hriman

Nayaswami Hriman

Ananda Seattle

Answer

Dear Friend,

Meditation will sometimes cause sleeplessness or reduce one’s need for sleep, but sleeplessness is also very common and can be caused by many other factors. The first and most important thing is whether your lack of sleep is causing problems in your life: doing your work during day is an obvious one; mood swings, fatigue, sleepiness, irritability and similar symptoms usually occur as well.

If, therefore, lack of sleep is causing problems (as I assume it is, or, soon will), you should adjust the time during the day when you meditate. Perhaps meditate earlier in the evening rather than just before bed. You might also have your longer meditation in the morning rather than late at night. It is important to have balance in your life that allows you to sustain your meditation practices over the years. Krishna in Bhagavad Gita says that yoga is not for those who sleep too much or sleep too little. The balanced, middle path is the way to find God.

As to the other symptom of — tingling in the forehead — that does indeed happen sometimes as a result of concentration at the point between the eyebrows. Of course, there can be other, natural causes as well. Unless it is very bothersome, I wouldn’t be concerned. If helpful, rub your forehead when it occurs; or, simply ignore it. Beyond that I would not ascribe any particular spiritual meaning to that phenomenon.

Ok?

Blessings to you,

Nayaswami Hriman

Henric Niles
Netherlands

Question

Yesterday I meditated and saw Europe from above, and I could see dark and gray energy covering it. From where I was I could see light energy pushing it away. Just before I almost fainted I saw a turquoise dragon with the golden mustache thing that Chinese dragons have. It had yellow eyes with a red iris. It came towards me, and it felt like it went through me. After I was just exhausted. What I saw, what does it mean? I have to say that I saw the dragon before multiple times while meditating.

Nayaswami Savitri

Nayaswami Savitri

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Henric, Thank you for writing us all the way from the Netherlands! Blessings to you!

Regarding visions in meditation: Just as is true in trying to analyze nightly dreams, it is not always necessary or even helpful to do so, unless it feels especially important to you for some reason. In any case, it is your vision or dream and no one can determine what it means better than you can.

Here’s one good way to do that for yourself. Just before your next meditation, write down the most striking elements of your vision. In this case, I’d say that would be the dark, gray energy covering Europe and the dragon. Pray for guidance, then set your list aside and try hard to forget it completely while you quiet your mind, watch your breath, and do whatever meditation techniques you practice ordinarily.

At the close of your meditation, ask again (without attachment or trying to figure it out on your own) what these symbols mean for you. Sit quietly and wait for the answers to come into your mind. If they don’t come immediately, then prayerfully wait a while — even for a few days or weeks, if necessary — don’t be impatient. Almost always, the true answers will be revealed to you at some point — and you'll know without question that they are true —  if you humbly and quietly keep asking for divine guidance. And remember that often the symbols represent a part of your inner being, rather than representing something or someone outside yourself.

Ricardo
Brazil

Question

Sitting in Half Lotus Position at the end of hong-sau technique, when I exhaled and held the breath as much as is comfortable, something strange happened. I did not feel the need to breathe again and the top of my body began to spin counter clockwise faster and faster. I was scared and went back to breathe forcefully. I meditate using the SRF techniques for more than two years and is the first time this happens. I ask, is it normal? and what should I do? Should I keep breathlessness and allow the spin?

Nayaswami Gyandev

Nayaswami Gyandev

Ananda Village

Answer

Dear Ricardo,

An experience such as you had is a very good thing. It is not unique, but as your past experience bears out, neither is it ordinary. The spinning was likely the result of your Kundalini energy beginning to rise, which needs to happen in order for one to grow spiritually. Kundalini rising should be a pleasant, enjoyable experience, not a scary one. However, even a positive thing can be a bit scary if it is extremely unfamiliar.

Swami Kriyananda recommended that, in a case such as this, you simply try to keep the body still so the experience stays as inward as possible, rather than getting translated into so much outward movement that it takes you out of the experience.

One more thing: Do not force the breath to stay out after you exhale at the end of Hong-Sau practice. Let it stay out as long as it wants to, but not longer. True breathlessness will happen on its own, not by force.

Best wishes for many more deep meditations.

Blessings,

Gyandev

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