Menu
Home > Kriya Yoga > Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

If you have any questions that aren’t answered here, please email us at kriyayoga2@ananda.org.

Some people claim they have the “real” or original kriya — why?

Lahiri Mahasaya had many disciples, and he taught Kriya to them with slight modifications depending on the needs of each individual. The essence of Kriya was taught the same, but you can see that there is no single original kriya, therefore. True spiritual Masters, like Lahiri Mahasaya and Paramhansa Yogananda, have the authority and understanding to teach Kriya in that way. Masters will also never claim to have the “only” true Kriya path, nor will they disparage others. Ananda teaches Kriya Yoga just as Yogananda taught it. He learned it from his Guru, Sri Yukteswar, who was a direct disciple of Lahiri Mahasaya. More information…

There are other groups that teach different “kriya” yogas — what’s the difference?

“Kriya” is a commonly used word in yoga. It literally means “action,” and is used to describe many different techniques. The Kriya that we teach at Ananda is specifically the Kriya Yoga of Lahiri Mahasaya.

Can Kriya Yoga be dangerous?

Kriya, when practiced under the guidance of an experienced Kriya teacher, is completely safe.

Do you have to pay to receive Kriya through Ananda?

There is a cost for the Ananda Course, and/or classes at an Ananda Center, to prepare for Kriya Initiation, along with guest fees if you receive Kriya at Ananda Village. At the initiation itself, there is a monetary offering that is entirely up to the individual.

Why do I have to practice the other techniques for a year before receiving Kriya?

First, the other techniques are part of the Path of Kriya Yoga. The Kriya Yogi continues to practice those techniques even after receiving the Kriya technique. Second, the Kriya technique is much more effective with the year of preparation. Finally, practicing Kriya requires a daily commitment to meditation. It can take up to a year to establish that practice.